Posts by Defying Doomsday


The next stop on our blog tour is at Skiffy and Fanty! As part of their “My Superpower” feature, Tsana talks about her amazing ability to dislocate joints in her sleep, and, of course, Defying Doomsday. My superpower is being able to mildly dislocate my joints in my sleep. My genetic medical condition makes me double jointed — not enough to ever become a contortionist, alas — and some of my joints are a bit unstable. Let...

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The next top on our blog tour is at the Australian Women Writers Challenge blog. Tsana talks generally about Defying Doomsday. We are particularly excited to be working with Twelfth Planet Press, who have published many books, especially by Aussie women writers. They have also won and been short-listed for many awards, both Australian and international. You can see some of the reviews of their books that have been submitted to the AWW...

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Author Spotlight: John Chu

Author Spotlight: John Chu


Posted By on Apr 18, 2015

We have already acquired some fantastic stories for Defying Doomsday and today we’re shining the spotlight on author John Chu! About John Chu: John Chu is a microprocessor architect by day, a writer, translator, and podcast narrator by night. His fiction has appeared or is forthcoming at Boston Review, Uncanny, Asimov’s Science Fiction, Apex Magazine and Tor.com. His story “The Water That Falls on You from...

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The next top on our blog tour is at A Fantastical Librarian. Tsana talks about why we chose the apocalypse theme for Defying Doomsday. My first thought was that I wanted to show through fiction that disabled and chronically ill people are capable of surviving hardship just like those women had in real life. I’m primarily a reader (and writer) of speculative fiction, so it made sense for me to try and think of a theme that was both...

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The next stop on our blog tour is at Stephanie Gunn’s blog. Holly talks about the myths surrounding disability. “There’s nothing black and white about disability. I don’t think it’s the sort of topic that many people would assume is black and white, and, yet, that’s definitely how it tends to be treated by a lot of society and mainstream culture.” Read more at Stephanie Gunn’s...

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